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Can you benefit from municipal bonds?

Posted August 21, 2013 in Advice Column, Beaverdale

During the past couple of years, the economic picture has brightened for many cities and states — but some of them are still facing potential financial problems.

As a citizen, you may have concerns about these issues. As an investor, these financial woes may affect your thinking about one type of investment vehicle: municipal bonds.

Given the difficulties faced by a few municipalities, should you consider adding “munis” to your to the fixed-income portion of your portfolio?

It is true that municipal defaults, though still rare, rose in 2012. But we haven’t experienced any sharp increases in defaults in 2013. Overall, default rates for municipal bonds are low — much lower than for corporate bonds of comparable quality, according to Moody’s Investor Services.

There are no guarantees, but stick with “investment-grade” municipal bonds to reduce the chances of being victimized by a default. Municipal bonds offer these benefits:

•    Tax advantages. Municipal bond interest payments are free from federal taxes and possibly state and local taxes, too. (However, some munis are subject to the alternative minimum tax, as well as state and local taxes.) This tax treatment means you would have to earn a much higher yield on other types of bonds to match the “taxable equivalent yield” of municipal bonds.

•    Civic benefits. By adding quality municipal bonds to your portfolio, you can help support worthwhile projects in your community, such as construction of schools and hospitals.

•    Steady income. Barring a default, you will receive a regular, predictable income stream for as long as you own your municipal bonds. However, if you currently own many long-term munis, you may want to consider reducing your overall position. Eventually, rising interest rates will push down bond prices, and long-term bonds carry added risk because their prices will decline more as interest rates rise. Work with your financial advisor to determine the most appropriate approach for your situation.

Consult your financial advisor to determine if municipal bonds can be an appropriate addition to your portfolio, as investing in bonds involves risks, including credit risk and market risk.
Bond investments are also subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease, and the investor can lose principal value if the investment is sold prior to maturity.

Investors should evaluate whether a bond ladder and the securities held within it are consistent with their investment objectives, risk tolerance and financial circumstances.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Information from Edward Jones, provided by Jim Talley, financial advisor at Edward Jones, 2703 Beaver Ave., 279-4179.





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